Activities

5 reasons to camp in Wales

Bell tent camping

Wales has spectacular scenery, from sweeping sandy beaches to ancient forests and of course, Snowdon, the country’s tallest mountain, towering some 1,085 metres above sea level.

On top of that, it has man-made attractions, from ancient castles to stomach-churning zip wires, which make it a place that will please everyone in your party!

1. Get closer to nature

Sure, there are some wonderful hotels, hostels and inns in Wales, but can you really get under the skin of a place by staying indoors?

The best way to experience Britain’s favourite beauty spots is to pitch up and camp.  You get to experience them by day and at night, taking in all the stars, sounds and smells of the “real” countryside.

But if the thought of camping brings to mind massive commercial campsites and fighting families, read on.

Modern camping, especially “nearly-wild” camping, offers a much more authentic experience, while glamping goes the other way – camping without the discomfort associated with pitching and striking  a tent!

Totally wild camping, also known as pitching your tent wherever you like, is not permissible in Wales without landowner permission.

However, there are plenty of places that offer something secluded and cosy, including in the grounds of many of our YHA properties.

2. Modern camping options made more exciting (and luxurious)

If the thought of camping makes you shudder, with memories of miserable rainy holidays where the tent collapsed, it is time to rethink things!

Most YHA properties now not only offer camping plots but also luxury glamping options such as bell tents, tipis, landpods or even cabins, which offer varying degrees of comfort.

A great example of one of our multi-purpose sites is YHA Brecon Beacons, which has not only the 41 bed hostel, but also offers wild camping, camping pods and landpods, meaning there really is something for everyone.

3. YHA campsites offer great multi-generational camping options

If you are considering camping with a group of people who span the generations – young children, teenagers, adults and older adults – it can often require a great deal of forward thinking and preparation!

Camping with kids and teenagers is generally speaking fairly easy to organise: simply bring separate tents, or else book the teenagers into a bell tent or tipi all to themselves.

4. YHA campsites are in the most popular Welsh locations

The best places to camp in Wales are the national parks and areas of natural beauty, of which there are many!

The must-sees include Snowdonia, Brecon Beacons and the Pembrokeshire Coast, all of which offer a different taste of Wales’ glorious landscape.

Snowdonia National Park

For the real adventurers who must climb peaks and scale the heights, nowhere in Wales can compare to Snowdonia National Park, home to Mount Snowdon.

Standing at over 1000 metres above sea level, the views from the top of Snowdon are spectacular.

The nearest YHA campsites to Snowdon are at YHA Snowdon Llanberis which also offers camping pods, and YHA Idwal Cottage, which has camping and a rustic hut that sleeps six.

However, this most famous of British peaks is not all this national park has to offer.

There are two fantastic railways, the Llanberis Lake Railway and the Snowdonia Mountain Railway as well as the three locations of the hair-raising Zip World; the other-worldly town of Portmerion, and Caernarfon Castle.

Brecon Beacons National Park

The Brecon Beacons National Park in South Wales is an area packed with things to do, including the largest show caves in Western Europe; the Dolaucothi Goldmine; Aberglasney stately home and the medieval castles of Dryslwyn, and Carreg Cennen, all set among the naturally lush and varied landscape.

Camping at YHA Llanddeusant offers the chance to stay in an international dark skies area, an area of outstanding natural beauty and an international Geo-park all at once!

The property also benefits from an on-site activity centre, where you can organise kayaking, climbing, caving, mountain biking, paddle-boarding, abseiling and more.

Pembrokeshire Coast National Park

Another must-visit Welsh location is the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park.

Set in the southwestern corner of the country, the area’s stunning beaches are renowned worldwide.

They offer the perfect setting for surfing, horse riding, or simply hiking or biking the coast path.

One of the most picturesque places to stay has to be YHA Broad Haven, which offers both camping and bell tents just a stone’s throw from the yellow-sand beach.

5. Camping is budget-friendly

Even the most glamorous of camping options is usually more economical than getting a private room at a basic hotel.

And whilst 2020 may not have been the year for overseas holidays, with places like Wales so easily accessible, there has never been a better time to plan a staycation.

Not only will you save money (and the environment) on flights, you can have a fabulous, bonding experience that doesn’t cost the earth.

*Access to shared areas is currently restricted following the Coronavirus pandemic. See our Covid statement for more information.


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